What Remains by Diane Peterson

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Holga images taken in the Andean Mountains in the village of Chugchillan, Ecuador. Located at approximately 13,000 ft., this small town has a population of about 28 extended families, farming being the main means of income.

Whenever visitors need anything…a question answered, car rental, a tour guide or a miriad of other challenges that might present themselves, all one needs to do is ask, within a few minutes someone has come to your rescue. Even in this remote location communication is not an issue.

Though certainly not at a loss for subject matter for my lens in such an incredible paradise, I was still eager to photograph the local burial spots and ancient churches.This small cemetary was just across the road from the hostel where I stayed. No orderly structured rows of headstones here,this is pretty typical of the small rural cemetaries in this part of the world.

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I am an American photographer living on the northern prairies of Idaho.However, my travels throughout the world have given me a perspective on my surroundings and have allowed me to “dream” when creating images I like to imagine are part of my reality.Off beat,sometimes quirky images emerge from my cameras. I like to explore alternative approaches to photography; much of the work I create is fueled by fragments of an imaginary existence. I use vintage, plastic and toy cameras as well as more modern slr’s and dslr’s. I develop all my own black and white film. View more of Diane’s work at color: #00ffff;”>her website, on her blog, or at Holgaville

10 thoughts on “What Remains by Diane Peterson”

  1. Great post for apres Day of the Dead/All Hallows Eve. Holga suits this graveyard to a T. Poetic, quiet, alive somehow. Love it!

  2. Wow Diane – I’m not usually a big fan of cemetery pictures, but yours have a poetry and sensitivity that really touches me. Well done!

  3. I am really not enthusiastic about cemetary’s..i am just fascinated how much work and effort goes into them…which usually means fodder for my lens.
    Thank you for your words…
    Diane

  4. Stark and unsettling were my first impressions with a strong urge to go back the way I came. The treatment is wonderful….the square format really works….complimenting all the great images. Super series!

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